Brewer of Limpë

“….But Meril said: ‘Fellowship is possible, maybe, but kinship not so, for Man is Man and Elda Elda, and what Ilúvatar has made unalike may not become alike while the world remains. Even didst thou dwell here till the Great End and for the health of limpë found no death, yet then must thou die and leave us, for Man must die once. And hearken, O Eriol, think not to escape unquenchable longing with a draught of limpë — for only wouldst thou thus exchange desires, replacing thy old ones with new and deeper and more keen. Desire unsatisfied dwells in the hearts of both those races that are called the Children of Ilúvatar, but with the Eldar most, for their hearts are filled with a vision of beauty in great glory.” – Meril-I-Turinqui to Eriol, from the Book of Lost Tales, Part One
53-9834-82Limpë was a magical drink of the Eldar in Tol Eressea.
It was fair and glorious to taste and could cure all ills to joy, merriment, and creativity. When Eriol (Ælfwine) meets Meril-i-Turinqi the Lady of Eressea, he learns about this drink, which by the words of the Elvish Queen, alone can cure and a draught of it gives a heart to fathom all music and song.
He wished to taste some of this substance, seeking kinship and fellowship with the Elves, but Turinqi (whom alone had the autorithy to gift the drink) denied, telling him that it is dangerous for a mortal Man, as Ilúvatar made his Children different, and drinking limpë would erase his old desires to awake new ones.
58-9344-68After the conversation with Turinqui, Eriol was hosted in the city of Tavrobel by Gilfanon, one of the oldest elves in Eressea, where he compiled the Golden Book with the tales he had heard, and only then was he allowed to drink limpë, as his desire for fellowship between Men and Elves was strong, even though he would at a time long for his homeland again.57-3032-89I’ll start by saying that the figure of a brewer is not mentioned in the Book of Lost Tales, but to produce a liquor, one needs a brewer right? 😀 So this elf lady is a brewer of limpë, the fabled nectar of Valinor (it literally means “drink of the Valar” in quenya). I invision it as a honey-like substance, so went with a full gold outfit to match. The brewer of limpë wears a beautifully embroidered golden robe, adorned with a leafy mantle and a hood that she always keeps on her head. She dances in the grape tub at the rhythm of her songs, blessing the season’s production of the blessed nectar, and walks barefoot. In her satchel she keeps always a vial of precious nectar.

Limpë being in the earliest drafts of Tolkien’s Legendarium could be considered as a precursor of Miruvor, although the cordial of Imladris is less potent than its ancestor… but this allowed me to make another post for my “Earliest Tales” collection! It has been so long since I made an outfit for this series, but sometimes the tiniest of details can be the inspiration that was lacking before.34-55

Lastly, we need a dignified drink emote. /drink and/toast are funny, but so over the top that no one would ever drink normally like that!

(Limpë is described in the earliest tales books (The Book of Lost Tales) which means that it is considered to be from J.R.R. Tolkien’s earlier, unrevised writings, so this information can’t necessarily be considered a canon.)

hat: High-warden’s Helm, gold dye, barter in Ost Galadh, warden class trainer (same looks as the Dar Narbugud warden helm)

shoulders: Songmaster’s Shoulders, gold dye, barter in Ost Galadh, minstrel class trainer (same looks as the Dar Narbugud minstrel shoulders)

chest: Robe of the Lady’s Wisdom, gold dye, barter in Caras Galadhon, loremaster trainer, the ceremonial version is available sometimes on the monthly mannequins

satchel: Second Age Runekeeper satchel lvl 100, gold dye, Tailor Guild crafted

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